Going fishing this summer in the Millennium Reserve, Chicago south lakefront regional geographic service area

Bronzeville Visitor Information Center volunteer staff, will facilitate another “free” outdoor recreational mobile tour, in collaborative partnerships with Black Metropolis/Pullman Porter Great Migration Blues Trail Environmental Education Outreach program and Fishing Buddies, on next Saturday July 9th, 2016 at 8:00 AM sharp!.

This time we will travel by tour bus to Wampum Lake which offers 4,800 feet of shoreline from which anglers can fish. In addition to fishing, the 412-acre Wampum Lakes Woods contains four large groves for picnicking.
As a great place for fishing and large gatherings, Wampum Lake Woods hosts many fishing contests in the summer. But no matter the size of a group or level of fishing expertise, Wampum is a great place to enjoy a beautiful day with friends and family.
The entrance to the preserve is on the north side of Thornton-Lansing Road. Parking is available along both sides of the access road. The picnic groves are open areas bordered on one side by woods. The second grove in from the entrance offers a shelter with multiple picnic tables. These large grassy areas are excellent for sports, games or even kite flying.
Shoreline fishing is available around most of the lake, and plenty of benches are provided along the southern shore.

The sandy soil of Wampum Lake supports unique plant life such as skunk cabbage and cinnamon ferns. Loons, eagles and osprey stop over at the preserve on their annual migration south in fall. Spring brings colorful flowers such as wild geranium, phlox and toothwort, as well as birds such as red-breasted mergansers, great blue herons and warblers.

But the species of greatest interest at the lake are the fish. Wampum Lake is best known for the size and number of perch, however a great many other fish swim here, such as largemouth bass, bluegill, sunfish, crappie, channel catfish and bullhead. On occasion fishermen have also reeled in good-sized northern pike.

West of the parking lot, natural springs create wet, marshy areas in the woods, particularly in spring.

www.fishin-buddies.net
We conserve the environment through outreach, restoration, and education.
Fishin’ Buddies! believes in the emotional and psychological restorative powers of the outdoors. We believe it is important to expose this philosophy to children who’s ideal of the “Great Outdoors” as being the grass-less, glass strewn, debris filled, concrete and steel playgrounds of urban America.

Harold L. Lucas

1.773-676-6207

www.bviconline.info

Blues Trail: A Trip Through History

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Blues Trail: A Trip Through History

A difficult journey. The promise of greater freedom, opportunity and a new home.

That is the story of the Great Migration (or Great Northern Migration) depicted in artist Alison Saar’s iconic bronze sculpture at King Drive and 26th Place in Chicago. It’s one of the many sights you can see on a dynamic and colorful bus tour that tells a vital story of Chicago’s rich African-American history.

The tour is called the Black Metropolis Pullman Porter Great Migration Blues Trail. It was created by longtime community leader Paula Robinson, activist Harold Lucas and activist scholar Dr. Lyn Hughes after they attended a conference on heritage tourism. “We ended up with this long name, and we laughed,” says Dr. Hughes, who founded the National A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, located in what is now the Pullman National Monument on Chicago’s southeast side. “And the name stuck.”

Perhaps a long, almost percussive-sounding name fits for the Blues Trail tour, which combines stops and stories that evoke our region’s pivotal role in the Great Migration, as a home for blues (and, later, “electric” blues), jazz and gospel music and so much more. The tour reflects the legacy of more than 500,000 African Americans who came to the Chicago area during the Great Migration.

The four-and-a-half hour Blues Trail tour begins at 820 S. Michigan Ave. and heads south from there.

Lucas, chief executive officer of the Black Metropolis Convention & Tourism Council, often leads the tour. Lucas says the tour not only reflects history, but also the deeply personal struggle of generations of African Americans whose lives have been shaped by the Great Migration. “At all times, we want to be true to the sons and daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of people who left the south and came to Chicago,” says Lucas.

Lucas also puts the tour in the context of Chicago – and the nation’s history. “The culture and politics of the South Side are not just tied to the Great Migration, but helped lead to the city’s first African American mayor and the first African American president of this country.”

One early stop on the tour literally links the past to the present: the Blues Heaven Foundation at 2120 S. Michigan Ave., which is just a stone’s throw from Millennium Reserve. The site was once the home of Chess Records, where Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy and others recorded music. The Blues Heaven Foundation is now operated by Keith Dixon Nelson, Willie Dixon’s grandson.

At 22nd Street, the tour focuses on demolition of housing that affected South Side communities. Later, the tour stops at the Walk of Fame in Bronzeville: 91 bronze plaques of cultural luminaries from Bronzeville’s past, including musician Louis Armstrong, poet Gwendolyn Brooks and Dr. Margaret Burroughs, founder of the DuSable Museum of African-American History.

Later, a stop at the Pullman Porter Museum shares the history of Pullman porters, who served American railroads from the late 1860s until late in the 20th Century. Under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph, Pullman porters formed the nation’s first all-black union.

“When we go to the Pullman Porter Museum, we learn about what the porters accomplished and what they had to endure,” says Cheryl Colbert, a longtime Bronzeville resident and volunteer who has led this and other tours. “They were the essential glue in the community that helped create the emerging black middle class. The other side was that they had to take so much abuse from the public.”

Blues Trail: A Trip Through History

A difficult journey. The promise of greater freedom, opportunity and a new home.

That is the story of the Great Migration (or Great Northern Migration) depicted in artist Alison Saar’s iconic bronze sculpture at King Drive and 26th Place in Chicago. It’s one of the many sights you can see on a dynamic and colorful bus tour that tells a vital story of Chicago’s rich African-American history.

The tour is called the Black Metropolis Pullman Porter Great Migration Blues Trail. It was created by longtime community leader Paula Robinson, activist Harold Lucas and activist scholar Dr. Lyn Hughes after they attended a conference on heritage tourism. “We ended up with this long name, and we laughed,” says Dr. Hughes, who founded the National A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, located in what is now the Pullman National Monument on Chicago’s southeast side. “And the name stuck.”

Perhaps a long, almost percussive-sounding name fits for the Blues Trail tour, which combines stops and stories that evoke our region’s pivotal role in the Great Migration, as a home for blues (and, later, “electric” blues), jazz and gospel music and so much more. The tour reflects the legacy of more than 500,000 African Americans who came to the Chicago area during the Great Migration.

The four-and-a-half hour Blues Trail tour begins at 820 S. Michigan Ave. and heads south from there.

Lucas, chief executive officer of the Black Metropolis Convention & Tourism Council, often leads the tour. Lucas says the tour not only reflects history, but also the deeply personal struggle of generations of African Americans whose lives have been shaped by the Great Migration. “At all times, we want to be true to the sons and daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of people who left the south and came to Chicago,” says Lucas.

Lucas also puts the tour in the context of Chicago – and the nation’s history. “The culture and politics of the South Side are not just tied to the Great Migration, but helped lead to the city’s first African American mayor and the first African American president of this country.”

One early stop on the tour literally links the past to the present: the Blues Heaven Foundation at 2120 S. Michigan Ave., which is just a stone’s throw from Millennium Reserve. The site was once the home of Chess Records, where Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy and others recorded music. The Blues Heaven Foundation is now operated by Keith Dixon Nelson, Willie Dixon’s grandson.

At 22nd Street, the tour focuses on demolition of housing that affected South Side communities. Later, the tour stops at the Walk of Fame in Bronzeville: 91 bronze plaques of cultural luminaries from Bronzeville’s past, including musician Louis Armstrong, poet Gwendolyn Brooks and Dr. Margaret Burroughs, founder of the DuSable Museum of African-American History.

Later, a stop at the Pullman Porter Museum shares the history of Pullman porters, who served American railroads from the late 1860s until late in the 20th Century. Under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph, Pullman porters formed the nation’s first all-black union.

“When we go to the Pullman Porter Museum, we learn about what the porters accomplished and what they had to endure,” says Cheryl Colbert, a longtime Bronzeville resident and volunteer who has led this and other tours. “They were the essential glue in the community that helped create the emerging black middle class. The other side was that they had to take so much abuse from the public.”

Lucas says the content of the tour also relates directly to what’s happening in Chicago, and many other cities, today. “We came to the northern cities to seek economic emancipation,” he says. “That’s still a major issue facing our communities.”

The Trail is one of many activities that focus on the legacy of African Americans in Chicago. This year is the centennial of the Great Migration, a milestone being recognized by the Great Migration Centennial Campaign. (Paula Robinson sits on the Great Migration Centennial Commission.)

For Colbert, the Blues Trail tour helps “preserve what remains of this community – but also invigorates the community and can bring people here. I think it can also inspire youth. When you know your history, it can influence the present and future.”

You can sign up for the Blues Trail tour, or book the tour for a group, by going to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-metropolis-pullman-porter-great-migration-blues-trail-tour-2016-includes-box-lunch-note-tickets-20351165885

Meeting with community organizer Harold Lucas

Harold Lucas, a career community organizer and urban preservationist, has worked to protect the authentic cultural legacy of Chicago’s Bronzeville community since 1973. Moreover, Mr. Lucas is the visionary behind the “Restoring Bronzeville” campaign that promotes the Black Metropolis Historic District as a premier African-American heritage tourism destination.

Preserving and enhancing the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center, the cultural heritage anchor to the south lakefront region of Chicago

Strategically located within the Supreme Life Building, as the
Gateway to the Black Metropolis National Heritage Area, the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center preserves and sustains the broader south lakefront region of Chicago, while serving as an anchor institution for branding, marketing and enhancing multiple cultural heritage tourism sites, attractions and destinations in Bronzeville.Continuing to develop the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center as the precious cultural heritage archival resource remains the goal of the Black Metropolis Convention & Tourism Council.

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Crook County’ investigates racism in Cook County criminal

Crook County’ investigates racism in Cook County criminal … – Chicago
www.chicagotribune.com/…/ct-prj-crook-county-nicole…
Chicago Tribune
Apr 27, 2016 – Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve’s powerful, well-timed book
about Cook County criminal courts draws from her years of research
into race and justice in Illinois. … The Cook County criminal
justice system — news flash! — is racist. … It is an entrenched
culture that, as Van Cleve amply …
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AFSC Letter-PLEASE RESPOND ASAP

May Day 2016 call to action: Filing a class action law suit to hold black elected officials accountable for conspiring to allow planned disenfranchisement, criminalization and displacement of lower and moderate income African Americans from the regentrified historic Bronzeville community!!!

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Southside neighborhood gems

(CHICAGO) ABC 7 EYEWITNESS MORNING NEWS, with co-anchor Terrell Brown, will leave the studio to broadcast live from the Bronzeville neighborhood to spotlight some of the outstanding people, organizations and residents who call the South Side their home. The two-and-a-half hour block of live news, featuring the best of the South Side, will air Friday, May 13 from 4:30-7 am. Morning co-anchor Judy Hsu will be anchoring the broadcast from the studio.
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